How to Check to See if Your Landline Phone Is Being Tapped

by Cristina Gauthier
Wire-tappings indicate that a third party is listening into your conversation.

Wire-tappings indicate that a third party is listening into your conversation.

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Listening into a conversation without the permission of the people in the conversation is a crime and act punishable by law in the United States. Although there are some cases where it is legal according to the law, this invasion of privacy is usually a result of a phone line being tapped. If you suspect your landline being tapped, there are various methods in which you can check whether your suspicions prove true or false.

Step 1

Listen for changes in volume as well as strange sounds when talking on the phone. Consistent static on the phone, as well as radio frequency interference are an indication of an amateur landline tap.

Step 2

Take apart the phone's handset by unscrewing the earpiece with a Phillips screwdriver. Lift the speaker to check for electronic devices attached to the wiring in the telephone. Reattach the phone with the screws provided.

Step 3

Position the phone tap detector device close to the phone. Unplug the telephone cord from the phone's base and insert it into the socket named "Tel in" socket on the phone tap detector. Insert a second telephone cord between the phone's base and "Tel out" socket on the detector. Check to see the LED light on the detector. A red light is an indication that the line is tapped.

Step 4

Keep a recording of the amount of times the phone rings and nobody is on the other line when you pick up the phone. An excessive amount of ringing times can indicate a wire-tapping.

Tip

  • Contact your phone company to let them know you suspect your landline is being tapped. Most service companies will inspect the situation for free, as well as remove any tracking devices on the phone. They may also notify local authorities.

About the Author

Cristina Gauthier began writing in 2003. The Poetry Institute of Canada published a poem and story of hers in the "Book of Verse: Voyages by Night" and the "Anthology of Short Stories: The Storyteller." Gauthier has a graphic design/arts degree from Rosemount Technology Center in Montreal.

Photo Credits

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